Zuleikha

Pages: 496
Subject: Fiction, Translated Fiction
Imprint: Oneworld

Zuleikha

Guzel Yakhina

Translated by Lisa C. Hayden
A multi-prize-winning debut novel from one of Russia's most exciting new talents
Hardback
9781786073495 (7 Feb 2019)
RRP £14.99 / US$26.95

The Book

 

WINNER OF THE BIG BOOK AWARD, THE YASNAYA POLYANA AWARD AND THE BEST PROSE WORK OF THE YEAR AWARD

The year is 1930. In a small Tatar village, a woman named Zuleikha watches as her husband is murdered by communists. Zuleikha herself is sent into exile, enduring a horrendous train journey to a remote spot on the Angara River in Siberia. Conditions in the camp are tough, and many of her group do not survive the first difficult winter. As she gets to know her companions - including a rather dotty doctor, an artist who paints on the sly, and Ignatov, her husband's killer - Zuleikha begins to build a new life that is far removed from the one she left behind.

Guzel Yakhina's outstanding debut has been showered with prizes and is capturing the hearts of readers all over the world.

Additional Information

Subject Fiction, Translated Fiction
Pages 496
Imprint Oneworld

 

About the Author

Guzel Yakhina (b. 1977 Kazan, Tatarstan) is a Russian author and filmmaker of Tatar origins. She graduated from the Kazan State Pedagogical University and completed her PhD at the Moscow Filmmaking School. Zuleikha is her first novel.

Lisa C. Hayden's translations from the Russian include Eugene Vodolazkin's Laurus, which won a Read Russia Award in 2016. Laurus and Lisa's translation of Vadim Levental's Masha Regina were both shortlisted for the Oxford-Weidenfeld Prize. Her blog, Lizok's Bookshelf, examines contemporary Russian fiction. She lives in Maine, USA.

Reviews

'Guzel Yakhina's novel hits the heart. It's a powerful anthem for love and tenderness in hell.'

- Ludmila Ulitskaya, author of The Big Green Tent

'There's something that Guzel Yakhina succeeds in transmitting with an amazing, sharp exactness: a woman's attitude towards love. Not towards a subject of love, but towards love itself.'

- Anna Narinskaya, literary critic