The Elusive Language of Ducks

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Pages: 384
Subject: Fiction
Imprint: Oneworld

The Elusive Language of Ducks

Judith White

A quirky, astute and heart-warming novel about human relationships — and a duck.
Paperback
9781780744001 (5 Jun 2014)
RRP £8.99 / US$15.99

The Book

As if it will make up for her loss, they bring Hannah a duckling to care for. They were well meaning, and it could have done the trick.

However, Hannah's focus on the duck progressively alienates those around her. As the duck takes over her world, past secrets are exposed. Will Hannah's life unravel completely?

This funny, moving and insightful novel contemplates the chemistry between one person and another: a man and another man's wife; a woman and a duck; a woman and her dead mother; a drug addict and his drug. Beautifully written, it is a penetrating and compassionate view of marriage, dependency, obsession, addiction, and love.

Additional Information

Subject Fiction
Pages 384
Imprint Oneworld

 

About the Author

Judith White is a winner of the BNZ Katherine Mansfield Centenary Award, and twice winner of the Auckland Star Short Story Competition. A collection of short stories, Visiting Ghosts, was shortlisted for the New Zealand Book Awards, and her first novel, Across the Dreaming Night, was shortlisted for the Montana New Zealand Book of the Year. She lives in Auckland, New Zealand.

Reviews

‘Sad but very funny… a perfect alternative to other summer reads’ 

- Residents' Journal

'Poetic and reflective, wry and playful at times, compassionate and observant... Ideas are mulled over and lived through, words polished, characters coaxed into life, flavours gradually deepen. The result is writing to savour.'

- Herald on Sunday

'It's poetic, gentle and wise... Wry and clever, The Elusive Language of Ducks transcends its bleak theme to leave us as thoughtful and questioning as its gentle protagonist.'

- Weekend Herald